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  Mustangsandmore Forum Archive
  '64 1/2 to '68 1/2 -- The Classic Mustang
  manual to power steering for 67 mustang

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Author Topic:   manual to power steering for 67 mustang
code1junkie
Journeyman

Posts: 8
From: Winston Salem, NC
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 02-24-2005 03:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for code1junkie        Reply w/Quote
I would like to know exactly what was needed to convert from manual to power steering on 67 mustang coupe. Thanks

whiteknight289
Gearhead

Posts: 1391
From: Wheaton, IL, USA
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 02-24-2005 07:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for whiteknight289        Reply w/Quote
For the power steering system itself, you'll need a pump, a slave cylinder, a control valve, a pressure hose, a return hose, and two short hoses that go between the valve and the cylinder.
The valve will thread on to the end of a drag link (or center link) that is different than your manual one.
You'll also need brackets and a pulley for putting the pump on your engine, and then a pulley on the crankshaft to drive the pump, and of course a belt. Take a look at your engine, you may be lucky and find you already have an unused groove on your crankshaft pulley that could be used for the power steering.
To attach the slave cylinder to the car you'll need a frame rail bracket that mounts under the steering gear box. The holes are already in the frame but you'll have to install threads by inserting a crush sleeve. Another way to do it is to drop a bolt down thru the frame rail. There is one oval access hole directly above one of the mounting holes, and for the other you would drill a 1" hole in the side of the frame so you could drop a bolt down inside. This gives you two studs hanging down from the frame so you can attach the bracket with nuts and lock washers.
Lastly, there were two different steering gear ratios. Manual cars use an easier to turn 19:1 ratio gearbox, power steering cars used 16:1. If you add power without changing the gearbox the steering will be light as a feather, almost too light and it feels kind of squirrely, but it could be done.
The engine brackets will be determined by what size engine you have, but the actual pump, valve, and cylinder are all the same.
The valve came in two sizes for '67, one has a 1/4" line and was used on everything but Shelbys, the other was 5/16" line and was used for Shelbys in '67 and all Mustangs starting in '68. You can use either one, you just need to be aware so that you get the right size line for it.
Hope this information is helpful!
Scott

indyphil
Gearhead

Posts: 3394
From: Senoia, G.A. USA
Registered: Jul 2002

posted 02-24-2005 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for indyphil        Reply w/Quote
Scott that was great info
I have another question that might benefit me and code1junkie

the idler arm: NPD lists different idler arms for power steering and manual steering. I assume that it must match the pitman arm that you have on the car? So you can mix a manual idler arm with a power pitman arm and Vice versa? But its OK to run power steering with a Manual pitman arm and a manual idler arm?

I went through the conversion from power to manual I have some more work to do yet but it seems to get a nice road feel with the power steering, cars had more castor. So when your done replacing all the parts you want to get an alignment and you might try a touch more castor if the wheels dont seem to want to return to center when exiting corners.

------------------
'68 coupe, '66 289 C code
engine, edel 600cfm carb, performer intake, dual exhaust http://www.geocities.com/ottouk_77/68mustang.htm

whiteknight289
Gearhead

Posts: 1391
From: Wheaton, IL, USA
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 02-24-2005 12:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for whiteknight289        Reply w/Quote
Good points on the idler and pittman arms. TO bring code1junkie up to speed, the idler arm goes on the passenger side end of the center link to connect the steering to the frame rail, and the pittman arm goes on the drivers side end and connects the steering gear box to the linkage.

My understanding on the differences in the idler arm:
Manual steering cars after going around a corner the steering will naturally want to return to center and the idler arm moves smoothly to allow this.
Power steering cars after going around a corner need some input from the driver to re-center the steering.
The idler arm on a power steering car has a rubber bushing that sits on a serrated washer. The teeth on the washer grip the rubber and pre-load it with tension as it turns, then unloads the tension to assist in getting it back to center.

I may be wrong, but that's the way it was explained to me.

Scott

code1junkie
Journeyman

Posts: 8
From: Winston Salem, NC
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 02-25-2005 12:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for code1junkie        Reply w/Quote
Hey thanks I appreciate the feedback.

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